By Akosua Albritton

July 28, 2015, 10:19 am

 

Mother Earth-or Father Geb for others—stretches her arms out to people and animals in an effort to keep us fed, cleansed, and renewed. When we include edible and medicinal weeds in our health arsenal, we do much to stay in balance. An essential in moving toxins out of the body is drinking clean water. The PUR water filters are good options. Staunch health enthusiasts who want the fluoride out will use four-stage purification systems or use distilled water.

The combination of clean water and medicinal plants intensifies the hydration and cleansing of human cells. The plants focused on today are red clover blossom (Trifolium pratense), mugwort (Artemesia vulgarius)t, and blue violet (Viola sororia). These plants are particularly healing for women. Blue violet and red clover blossom are anti-cancer agents. Did your eyes open when you read that? These plants help us deal with carcinogens. It is not suggested that a cancer patient on an allopathic regimen discontinue the regimen. Drinking the teas are additions to your health arsenal.

Red clover blossoms show themselves in the spring. The clover stems grow thigh high in bunches spanning one to three yards. The flower is more pink or mauve. The word red is used to distinguish is from the white clover that grows low to the ground. The red blossoms are proven to purify the blood, serve as an appetite suppressant, and are anti-biotic. They are good for inflamed lungs and liver disease. Be careful to not overdo drinking this tea because it is diuretic,

Red clover can be found in vacant lots and lawns. Red clover likes company; so it is rare to find a single red clover plant. When you find a patch, pull the blossoms off and leave the rest of the plant intact. After rinsing them, let dry on paper near a window. Collecting your own red clover will save money.

Blue violet has the following medicinal properties: mucilaginous, laxative, emetic, and alterative. In other words, blue violet is good for regular, daily evacuation of the bowels. Blue violet is a remedy for coughs, colds, sore throat, and tumors. When combined with red clover and vervaine, the stem is beneficial for treating cancer, cancerous growths, and skin diseases.

Blue violet’s appearance is that of a low-growing plant with a small violet flower with a yellow pistol, enfolded by its curving wrinkled leaves. When spread open, the leaves are heart-shaped. Blue violet also enjoys the company of other blue violets. They grow in yards and through cracks in pavement. The green leaves will continue to grow to larger proportions after the purple flower has dried and fallen away.

Blue violet is a good addition to a salad. Chop the leaves before tossing into the salad bowl. Use sparingly though, being mindful of its laxative effect.

Mugwort is what I call the “Woman’s Excellent Friend”. It is helpful in all phases of the reproductive system’s life cycle. It also helps to make dreams clearer and easier to remember. During the fertile phase, it aids in correcting amenorrhea by inducing menses. Mugwort is good for easing nervousness, shaking, and insomnia. It is used to stimulate the liver and as a digestive aid. The juice from the leaves or stem can treat poison ivy.

Mugwort can grow to six feet. It has a pleasant aromatic scent. It has a combination of short narrow leaves and spreading, thick mesh leaves. Native Americans use it as a spiritual cleanser. People toss it into bath water or pass it over their auras. Besides amenorrhea, the tea is good for the flu and kidney disease. Other people swear to its power to allay hot flashes in minutes for those who experience severe temperature increases. For those with more manageable hot flashes, mugwort may stop the episodes altogether. Additionally, avoiding sugared foods and replacing sugar with agave or eating fruit are other steps to allaying or slaying the dragon, Hot Flash.

Imagine that: women have options. Buy these herbs by the ounce at apothecaries or boxed at health food stores, or search them out in the neighborhood—away from the roads.

Red clover
red clover

Blue Violet
Blue Violet

Mugwort
mugwort


Want to write for us? We're looking for interns and experienced writers! Go here for more information.

About The Author

Akosua is a communicator who loves to inform, engage, and enable her fellow New Yorkers. You may find her in a classroom, in an auditorium, or on a city street teaching the social sciences. Her favorite topics are Brooklyn culture & history, consumer technology, edible weeds, and African cinema. She holds a MS in City Planning from Pratt Institute.

Akosua is a communicator who loves to inform, engage, and enable her fellow New Yorkers. You may find her in a classroom, in an auditorium, or on a city street teaching the social sciences. Her favorite topics are Brooklyn culture & history, consumer technology, edible weeds, and African cinema. She holds a MS in City Planning from Pratt Institute.

2 Responses

  1. Alcoholism Dry Eyes - Alcohol Rehab Center

    […] Some Plants are Very Friendly with Women – Did your eyes open when you read that? These plants help us deal with carcinogens. It is not suggested that a cancer patient on an allopathic regimen discontinue the regimen. Drinking the teas … After rinsing them … […]

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.