By Yako and Krystal

June 12, 2014, 2:50 pm

 

Cigarette_smoke

Yes, I am addicted to smoking. I’m talking about cigarettes, not the other kind. It’s an awful affliction and so hard to get rid of! I’ve tried a couple of things: gradually decreasing my cigarette intake – didn’t work. Quitting cold turkey – didn’t work. Nicotine patches – didn’t work. Bupropion – didn’t work. Listen to well-intended advice and persuasions of friends – didn’t work.

I also read Allen Carr’s Easy Way to Stop Smoking a couple of years ago. That actually did work and I was able to stay away from the cancer sticks for a year. I picked it back up again. Not because of a stressful occurrence, but because I was out with friends who were smoking and I suddenly joined them without thinking about it.

Every pack I buy I tell myself, this is the last one. But after I smoke my so-called last cigarette, the next thing I do is walk to the corner store and buy another pack. I shut out all reasoning of why I should not buy that next pack. I just do it. I wish they put a ban on selling cigarettes. But that’s really not the solution either, because it puts responsibility for your own health outside of yourself.

Fortunately, one is not allowed to smoke in public places, restaurants, bars, parks, etc. This is great because other people won’t be bothered so much and at the same time it has the beneficial advantage that smokers are not smoking while in those places. Perhaps I should spend more time in bars!

3-excuses-for-smoking-1The smoking ban was also implemented in The Netherlands, but met with a lot of protest. Some even tried to establish smoking as a form of religion. Smoking would be allowed in case a business would institute as a church under that religion. That one failed, however in certain bars, smoking after hours is allowed. Also, in Dutch coffee shops (you know what I mean, the ones where they don’t sell coffee), smoking joints was still allowed as long as they did not contain any tobacco.

People smoke for different reasons. I smoke as an excuse to take a break from whatever I am doing. It might be after I completed a task at work, or when I am bored with a conversation in bar (“Very interesting! I’m going for a cigarette break and I’ll be right back!”), or after a meal, or just because I think I need a break. You see, smokers will come up with any excuse to light one up.

When I was young, smoking was considered cool. I was actually talking to my cousin, Boris, about that today (also from The Netherlands and currently living and working in the UK). He is a total non-smoker, but shared with me that he used to be jealous of smokers when he was a kid. They were all so connected and seemed to enjoy each other’s company when hanging out in the kitchen or on the balcony at parties or other gatherings.

He felt excluded and wanted to belong, but he never picked up smoking. Even now, when he sees a group of smokers, his youth trauma returns and he longs to join. I salute him from fighting that urge and follow his own direction!

Smoking is not so cool anymore — it’s sooner pretty sad. Just look at those awful ads on TV on how you will end up as a smoker if you don’t quit now. These ads will probably help prevent someone to start smoking, but they do not help someone to quit smoking. Actually it has the reverse effect. Let me elaborate.

Smoking gives you the illusion that it raises your energy level and reduces your stress level. That is true for a short moment, but then your energy level drops to a level lower than it was before your cigarette (and similarly your stress level rises to a level that is slightly higher). Consequently you will need another cigarette to get you back to that energy/ stress level. The following charts illustrate this.

Levels

And this is the secret of smoking. Once you realize this, you will also see how the doom ads have a reverse effect. Smokers experience stress when they see this ad, so what do they do? They pick up a cigarette to get rid of that feeling of stress!

So what to do then? Well, the answer is easy. Just stop bitching about it and f*cking quit. The side effects from giving up smoking are not so severe for most people. You might get a bit moody, but that will pass. You will have cravings and a desire to eat more, but you can simply replace that with drinking lots of water (which is healthy by the way).

Anyways, there is no real reason to keep smoking. If only I was so disciplined.

Yako


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About The Author

Yako: Born on a farm in The Netherlands, Europe, I was always on quest for adventure. As a small boy, I was already interested in learning about other cultures and pretended I was fluent in American (I later learned that Americans speak English). At the age of 23, I traveled to South Africa where I lived for seven months to finalize my thesis for my master's in Business Administration. After that, I worked for eight years for a bank in Amsterdam, but I became restless and decided to quit my job and make the big leap across the ocean to New York. Studying arts and culture management at Pratt Institute helped me eradicate some of the prejudices I had of Americans. I never thought I would stay this long. But now eight years later, I'm still here. I live in Central Brooklyn and work for Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation with great satisfaction. So far, my life feels as if I’m on one big adventure. | Krystal: As a native of Michigan, I moved to New York with a limited perspective of the depth and importance of social differences. Having a passion for creativity, I accepted the various ideas behind expression and equality that poured out from this beautiful, diverse place called Brooklyn. After graduating from Pratt Institute in 2006 with a degree in Communications Design and barely surviving the effects of forced independence, I started an open relationship with the nonprofit world and began to willingly become my own person. Since then, I have been employed and freelance as a graphic designer, with tons of exposure to the things that fascinated me as a child. Living in two culturally different environments has granted me a faceted understanding of social norms and injustices that I feel compelled to speak on. Though visual art and design have been my concentrations since grade school, writing and sharing thoughts socially has been my core calling. In keeping my promise to my parents, I have finally decided to write for social impact. Standing up for my truth while seeking and discovering the truths of others is the way in which I've chosen to take that on. So far, I've discovered that the most direct route to societal improvements begins with the coupling of self-awareness and humility.

Yako: Born on a farm in The Netherlands, Europe, I was always on quest for adventure. As a small boy, I was already interested in learning about other cultures and pretended I was fluent in American (I later learned that Americans speak English). At the age of 23, I traveled to South Africa where I lived for seven months to finalize my thesis for my master's in Business Administration. After that, I worked for eight years for a bank in Amsterdam, but I became restless and decided to quit my job and make the big leap across the ocean to New York. Studying arts and culture management at Pratt Institute helped me eradicate some of the prejudices I had of Americans. I never thought I would stay this long. But now eight years later, I'm still here. I live in Central Brooklyn and work for Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation with great satisfaction. So far, my life feels as if I’m on one big adventure. | Krystal: As a native of Michigan, I moved to New York with a limited perspective of the depth and importance of social differences. Having a passion for creativity, I accepted the various ideas behind expression and equality that poured out from this beautiful, diverse place called Brooklyn. After graduating from Pratt Institute in 2006 with a degree in Communications Design and barely surviving the effects of forced independence, I started an open relationship with the nonprofit world and began to willingly become my own person. Since then, I have been employed and freelance as a graphic designer, with tons of exposure to the things that fascinated me as a child. Living in two culturally different environments has granted me a faceted understanding of social norms and injustices that I feel compelled to speak on. Though visual art and design have been my concentrations since grade school, writing and sharing thoughts socially has been my core calling. In keeping my promise to my parents, I have finally decided to write for social impact. Standing up for my truth while seeking and discovering the truths of others is the way in which I've chosen to take that on. So far, I've discovered that the most direct route to societal improvements begins with the coupling of self-awareness and humility.

One Response

  1. harleyrider1978

    Judge doesnt accept statistical studies as proof of LC causation!

    It was McTear V Imperial Tobacco. Here is the URL for both my summary and the Judge’s ‘opinion’ (aka ‘decision’):

    http://boltonsmokersclub.wordpress.com/the-mctear-case-the-analysis/

    (2.14) Prof Sir Richard Doll, Mr Gareth Davies (CEO of ITL). Prof James Friend and
    Prof Gerad Hastings gave oral evidence at a meeting of the Health Committee in
    2000. This event was brought up during the present action as putative evidence that
    ITL had admitted that smoking caused various diseases. Although this section is quite
    long and detailed, I think that we can miss it out. Essentially, for various reasons, Doll
    said that ITL admitted it, but Davies said that ITL had only agreed that smoking might
    cause diseases, but ITL did not know. ITL did not contest the public health messages.
    (2.62) ITL then had the chance to tell the Judge about what it did when the suspicion
    arose of a connection between lung cancer and smoking. Researchers had attempted
    to cause lung cancer in animals from tobacco smoke, without success. It was right,
    therefore, for ITL to ‘withhold judgement’ as to whether or not tobacco smoke caused
    lung cancer.

    [9.10] In any event, the pursuer has failed to prove individual causation.
    Epidemiology cannot be used to establish causation in any individual case, and the
    use of statistics applicable to the general population to determine the likelihood of
    causation in an individual is fallacious. Given that there are possible causes of lung
    cancer other than cigarette smoking, and given that lung cancer can occur in a nonsmoker,
    it is not possible to determine in any individual case whether but for an
    individual’s cigarette smoking he probably would not have contracted lung cancer
    (paras.[6.172] to [6.185]).
    [9.11] In any event there was no lack of reasonable care on the part of ITL at any
    point at which Mr McTear consumed their products, and the pursuer’s negligence
    case fails. There is no breach of a duty of care on the part of a manufacturer, if a
    consumer of the manufacturer’s product is harmed by the product, but the consumer
    knew of the product’s potential for causing harm prior to consumption of it. The
    individual is well enough served if he is given such information as a normally
    intelligent person would include in his assessment of how he wishes to conduct his
    life, thus putting him in the position of making an informed choice (paras.[7.167] to
    [7.181]).

    Reply

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