By Yako and Krystal

March 18, 2014, 7:21 am

 

 

FWB photographers

FWB photographers

I visited Fashion Week Brooklyn (FWB) this past Saturday, March 15. A friend of mine had invited me and was able to arrange a press pass for me as well as a VIP seat in the front row.

I guess that is one of the perks of being a columnist for The Brooklyn Reader (as well as having good friends).

It was an interesting event, especially since I do not know a lot about fashion shows. I believe I have been to a total of three fashion shows in my entire life. The first time was in Amsterdam, also by invitation of a friend, who is a famous stylist in The Netherlands.

That one was quiet embarrassing, since I did not know any of the designers or the celebrities that attended. My friend introduced me to someone I knew from TV, but I could not place her and he left me hanging. I literary stood there like a deer in headlights. Fortunately they ignored me completely and I was able to sneak away and score a glass of wine to muster up some courage to face the next embarrassment.

I tend to worry about what to wear to these type of events. You certainly don’t want to outshine the designers or models. Not that that is a big concern, since I dress pretty conservative. But you also don’t want to appear too conservative as if just walking in from an office accounting job (nothing wrong with being an accountant and some of them are actually pretty fashionable).

For the fashion show in Amsterdam I had asked my friend what to wear and he explained that black attire would always work. I should not have listened to him. Everyone was wearing amazing outfits and I felt totally underdressed. For Fashion Week Brooklyn, I decided on light grey slacks, a dark blue slim fit dress shirt, and burgundy dress shoes. European stylish and not too trendy. It worked out fine this time.

As I had mentioned, I do not know a lot about fashion shows, so you might wonder why I would write about it? Well, simply because, the things that I don’t know anything about fascinate me. If you watch Discovery Channel from time to time, you can probably relate to that.

I also would like to bring up Cathy Horyn. I had never heard of her, but the gentleman that was sitting next to me at FWB told me that she did not know a thing about fashion when she entered the fashion industry as a journalist. However, she became one of the most feared critics in fashion.

Who knows, perhaps there is a future in fashion for me as well.

 

AKOU

AKOU

I actually was in good company at FWB. My guess is that about 80% of the guests had never been to a fashion show before. That was evidenced by some of things I observed and that regular attendees of fashion shows would not be guilty of:

  • Several people stepped or walked on the pristine white runway. It left a lot of black shoe marks before the show even started.
  • Others in the front seats leaned forward during the show. This took away the vision for the photographers and rest of the audience.
  • Some people in the front seats had their legs crossed with their legs dangling over the catwalk (the front seats are usually very close to the catwalk). This again diminishes photo opportunities and takes away from the catwalk experience.
  • A couple of ladies in the front seats were wearing skirts that were so short, that one could see that they were wearing panties (I’m not a pervert, they were right across from me and there was no way around it).

I liked a lot of the designers. My favorite one was AKOU, who also happens to be a friend of the friend who had invited me. The dresses were elegant, but playful at the same time. Some examples (Photography by Shawn Punch):

 

Akou Fall 2014

Akou Fall 2014

Akou Fall 2014

Akou Fall 2014

AKOU was also the only designer that was listed as coming from New York. However, I don’t think any of the designers were from Brooklyn though.

We should probably do something about that. I know for a fact that Brooklyn has many fashion designers. I have met so many young people in Central Brooklyn that are into fashion, designing apparel, modifying existing clothing into something amazing and fashionable, etc.

Perhaps not all are ready for Brooklyn Fashion Week, but it would be great if there was an event were they could make a start. Just showcasing their talent, getting some exposure (and tips for next steps).

A try-out for fashion designers in Central Brooklyn is what we need, because I bet there are more do’s and don’ts as it comes to designing fashion as there are with just simply attending a fashion show.

To all fashion designers out there: Let’s stick our heads together and make something happen.

Yako


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About The Author

Yako: Born on a farm in The Netherlands, Europe, I was always on quest for adventure. As a small boy, I was already interested in learning about other cultures and pretended I was fluent in American (I later learned that Americans speak English). At the age of 23, I traveled to South Africa where I lived for seven months to finalize my thesis for my master's in Business Administration. After that, I worked for eight years for a bank in Amsterdam, but I became restless and decided to quit my job and make the big leap across the ocean to New York. Studying arts and culture management at Pratt Institute helped me eradicate some of the prejudices I had of Americans. I never thought I would stay this long. But now eight years later, I'm still here. I live in Central Brooklyn and work for Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation with great satisfaction. So far, my life feels as if I’m on one big adventure. | Krystal: As a native of Michigan, I moved to New York with a limited perspective of the depth and importance of social differences. Having a passion for creativity, I accepted the various ideas behind expression and equality that poured out from this beautiful, diverse place called Brooklyn. After graduating from Pratt Institute in 2006 with a degree in Communications Design and barely surviving the effects of forced independence, I started an open relationship with the nonprofit world and began to willingly become my own person. Since then, I have been employed and freelance as a graphic designer, with tons of exposure to the things that fascinated me as a child. Living in two culturally different environments has granted me a faceted understanding of social norms and injustices that I feel compelled to speak on. Though visual art and design have been my concentrations since grade school, writing and sharing thoughts socially has been my core calling. In keeping my promise to my parents, I have finally decided to write for social impact. Standing up for my truth while seeking and discovering the truths of others is the way in which I've chosen to take that on. So far, I've discovered that the most direct route to societal improvements begins with the coupling of self-awareness and humility.

Yako: Born on a farm in The Netherlands, Europe, I was always on quest for adventure. As a small boy, I was already interested in learning about other cultures and pretended I was fluent in American (I later learned that Americans speak English). At the age of 23, I traveled to South Africa where I lived for seven months to finalize my thesis for my master's in Business Administration. After that, I worked for eight years for a bank in Amsterdam, but I became restless and decided to quit my job and make the big leap across the ocean to New York. Studying arts and culture management at Pratt Institute helped me eradicate some of the prejudices I had of Americans. I never thought I would stay this long. But now eight years later, I'm still here. I live in Central Brooklyn and work for Bedford Stuyvesant Restoration Corporation with great satisfaction. So far, my life feels as if I’m on one big adventure. | Krystal: As a native of Michigan, I moved to New York with a limited perspective of the depth and importance of social differences. Having a passion for creativity, I accepted the various ideas behind expression and equality that poured out from this beautiful, diverse place called Brooklyn. After graduating from Pratt Institute in 2006 with a degree in Communications Design and barely surviving the effects of forced independence, I started an open relationship with the nonprofit world and began to willingly become my own person. Since then, I have been employed and freelance as a graphic designer, with tons of exposure to the things that fascinated me as a child. Living in two culturally different environments has granted me a faceted understanding of social norms and injustices that I feel compelled to speak on. Though visual art and design have been my concentrations since grade school, writing and sharing thoughts socially has been my core calling. In keeping my promise to my parents, I have finally decided to write for social impact. Standing up for my truth while seeking and discovering the truths of others is the way in which I've chosen to take that on. So far, I've discovered that the most direct route to societal improvements begins with the coupling of self-awareness and humility.

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