By Brooklyn Reader

February 2, 2014, 6:00 am

 

(l to r) Public Advocate Letitia James, Deputy Brooklyn Borough President Diana Reyna, Council Member Darlene Mealy, Council Member Robert Cornegy, Jr., Council Member Inez Barron, Deputy Postmaster General Ronald Stroman, actress Anika Noni Rose, Reverend Al Sharpton, Representative Yvette Clarke, Representative Charles Rangel, Representative Hakeem Jeffries, Representative Gregory Meeks, Representative Robin Kelly, State Senator Velmanette Montgomery, Assembly Member Walter Mosley, Concord Baptist Church Pastor Gary Simpson and Shirley Chisholm Cultural Institute for Children, Inc. representative Bill Howard.

(l to r) Public Advocate Letitia James, Deputy Brooklyn Borough President Diana Reyna, Council Member Darlene Mealy, Council Member Robert Cornegy, Jr., Council Member Inez Barron, Deputy Postmaster General Ronald Stroman, actress Anika Noni Rose, Reverend Al Sharpton, Representative Yvette Clarke, Representative Charles Rangel, Representative Hakeem Jeffries, Representative Gregory Meeks, Representative Robin Kelly, State Senator Velmanette Montgomery, Assembly Member Walter Mosley, Concord Baptist Church Pastor Gary Simpson and Shirley Chisholm Cultural Institute for Children, Inc. representative Bill Howard.

On Friday at Brooklyn Borough Hall, the U.S. Postal Service honored Bed-Stuy native and former Rep. Shirley Chisholm with a postal stamp.

Shirley Chisholm was the first African-American woman elected to Congress in 1968 and the first woman to seek the Democratic presidential nomination in 1972.

Her stamp, featuring a painting by artist Robert Shetterly, is the 37th in the Postal Services’ Black Heritage series.

Chisholm was the first African-American woman to serve in Congress and was a candidate for the Democratic presidential nomination in 1972.

The ceremony was attended by more than a dozen elected officials of color from across the city.

“Congresswoman Chisholm’s groundbreaking and historic advocacy for women and the African-American community across the nation is a source of constant strength and inspiration,” said Assemblyman Walter Mosley. “Every day, when I walk into my office at the Shirley Chisholm State Office Building and am greeted by her portrait outside my door, I am reminded of her legacy as one of the greatest catalysts for change of the 20th century.”

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams (left-center) commemorates the unveiling of the new United States Postal Service’s Forever stamp in honor of Shirley Chisholm at a ceremony inside Brooklyn Borough Hall

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams (left-center) commemorates the unveiling of the new United States Postal Service’s Forever stamp in honor of Shirley Chisholm at a ceremony inside Brooklyn Borough Hall
Photo: Kathryn Kirk

Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams asked the rhetorical question, if Chisholm were alive today would she place a stamp of approval on us?  “I welcome you to join me in this charge to continue the great life of Shirley Chisholm,” said Adams. “I am ready and I am engaged…to be part of this movement as we move forward of ensuring that we instill hope and prosperity into every Brooklynite. Let’s start this journey together.” 

Mosley:

 

 

 

 

; he was joined by


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