By Brooklyn Reader

February 19, 2014, 10:20 am

 

The triangular shaped sculpture, conceptualized and designed by Judy Chicago, was created by hundreds of women volunteers in ceramic sculpture and woven, hand embroidered and sewn fabrics, all traditional “craft” materials. The work is a permanent installation in the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art

The triangular shaped sculpture, conceptualized and designed by Judy Chicago, was created by hundreds of women volunteers in ceramic sculpture and woven, hand embroidered and sewn fabrics, all traditional “craft” materials. The work is a permanent installation in the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art

The Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum marks its seventh anniversary in March with a series of public programs that will launch with a special discussion between groundbreaking feminist artist Judy Chicago and public historian and social activist Dr. Elizabeth A. Sackler.

The discussion between Chicago and Sackler will focus on the challenges facing women in the art world in the 21st Century. Other events include a discussion, “Sentenced to Change with Piper Kerman,” led by Piper Kerman, author of Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison; and a film screening of Crime After Crime.

Judy Chicago, Gloria Steinem and Elizabeth A. Sackler (left to right) at the preview of the Brooklyn Museum's Elizabeth A Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Photograph: Mary Altaffer/AP

Judy Chicago, Gloria Steinem and Elizabeth A. Sackler (left to right) at the preview of the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Photograph: Mary Altaffer/AP

 

To follow are a list of events through the months of March and April. All events are free with Museum admission. For more information, visit www.brooklynmuseum.org.Sunday, March 9, 3 p.m.

Sunday, March 9, 3:00pm

Judy Chicago with Elizabeth A. Sackler: “Changing Institutions,” Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium, 3rd Floor. Free with Museum admission

Pioneering artist of the feminist movement Judy Chicago and public historian and social activist Elizabeth A. Sackler discuss the challenges and successes of changing such established institutions as museums and studio art education. Frankly discussing her own experiences as a student, teacher, and artist, Chicago tackles such topics as sexism and bias that many young artists face, offering bold solutions to these problems, calling for curriculum reform, and providing practical advice “beyond the diploma” to young artists.

A painting byy Judy Chicago

A painting byy Judy Chicago

A signing of Chicago’s new book Institutional Time: A Critique of Studio Art Education follows. The exhibition Chicago in L. A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work, 1963-74 will be on view from April 4 through September 28, 2014. The exhibition, which presents Chicago’s work leading up to the creation of her iconic work The Dinner Party, is among several programs and exhibitions that will be presented nationwide throughout the year celebrating the artist’s seventy-fifth birthday.

 

Saturday, March 15, 3:30pm

Panel Discussion: “Sentenced to Change with Piper Kerman,” Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium, 3rd Floor. Free with Museum admission

Piper Kerman, author of the memoir Orange is the New Black: My Year in a Women’s Prison, the basis for the Netflix original series, leads a conversation with an inspiring group of formerly incarcerated women who have initiated criminal justice reform. Panelists include Stacey McGruder, founder of Sisters That Been There; Vivian Nixon, Executive Director of the College and Community Fellowship at CUNY; and Tina Reynolds, founder of Women on the Rise Telling Her Story (WORTH) and a leader of the national reproductive justice campaign, Birthing Behind Bars. Part of the series, “States of Denial: The Illegal Incarceration of Women, Children, and People of Color.”

Piper Kerman (r) with actress Taylor Schilling who plays her character in "Orange is the New Black"

Piper Kerman (r) with actress Taylor Schilling who plays her character in “Orange is the New Black”

 

Thursday, March 27, 7:00pm

Panel Discussion: “The Future is History,” Martha A. and Robert S. Rubin Pavilion, 1st Floor. Free with Museum admission

Panelists will discuss the impact of feminism on contemporary art and preserving the legacies of feminist artists and spaces in New York City. Daria Dorosh, artist and Co-founder, A.I.R. Gallery, will moderate a discussion between Deborah Bershad Addeo, art historian and Project Director, NYC Landmarks50; Leah DeVun, artist and historian; Katherine Hubbard, artist; Corrine Fitzpatrick, writer; and Christina Stahr Hunter, artist and Director, Nancy Graves Foundation. Organized in conjunction with A.I.R. Gallery and the Institute for Women and Art at Rutgers University.

 

Saturday, March 29, 2:00pm

Panel Discussion: “Mass Incarceration’s Impact on Black and Latino Women and Children,” Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Forum, 4th Floor. Free with Museum admission

An intergenerational panel examines the devastating impact the youth justice system has on black and Latino young people, as well as health care for incarcerated women, and the need for comprehensive reform. Soffiyah Elijah, Executive Director of the Correctional Association moderates a discussion between Hernan Carvente, Research Assistant, Vera Institute of Justice; Gabrielle Horowitz-Prisco, Project Director, Juvenile Justice Project, Correctional Association; Mercedes Smith, Policy Specialist, Women on the Rise Telling Her Story (WORTH); and Tamar Kraft-Stolar, Project Director, Women in Prison Project, Correctional Association. Part of the series, “States of Denial: The Illegal Incarceration of Women, Children, and People of Color.”

 

Thursday, April 3, 7:00pm

Film and Conversation: “Crime After Crime,” Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Forum, 4th Floor. Free with Museum admission

Crime After Crime (Yoav Potash, 2011, 93 min.) follows the story of Deborah Peagler, a survivor of domestic violence who was wrongfully imprisoned for over 25 years for the murder of her abuser. Attorneys Nadia Costa and Joshua Safran reopen her case pro-bono in a fight to rectify injustice against battered women. Followed by a Q&A with Costa and Safran. Part of the series, “States of Denial: The Illegal Incarceration of Women, Children, and People of Color.”

CrimeAfterCrime-8halfx11-quote-poster

 

Sunday, April 13, 2:00pm

Exhibition Talk: “From Finish Fetish to Feminism,” Iris and B. Gerald Cantor Auditorium, 3rd Floor. Free with Museum admission

A conversation between artist Judy Chicago; Catherine Morris, Sackler Family Curator of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, Brooklyn Museum; and art historian Frances Borzello traces the early evolution of this iconic artist’s work. In conjunction with the exhibition Chicago in L.A.: Judy Chicago’s Early Work, 1963-74, the talk will follow Chicago’s career from her participation in Minimalism and Finish Fetish to the start of The Dinner Party, which has been permanently housed at the Brooklyn Museum since 2007. A book signing will follow. 

 

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